Modern condensed matter physics is to discover and realize novel physical properties, embracing three central themes - strong correlation, low dimen-sionality, and topology. Although these topics were traditionally regarded separate, it is recently being recognized that they are all intertwined in quantum materials.

So far, a majority of research has focused on "finding" quantum materials with novel properties. Herein, we take a rather unique approach to devise a new platform and realize exotic phenomena, manipulating spatio-temporal parameters. For example, combining different materials into ultrathin film heterostructures leads to unprecedented phenomena via quantum inter-ference between them, and harnessing nonlinear optics leads to modifi-cation of electronic structure of the quantum material. Employing this unique approach and leveraging our expertise, we aim to accomplish challenging yet feasible objectives:
Research
Overview

electronic
structures
group

ESG
Unconventional Superconductivity
Magnetic Topology
Flat Band Surface
Ultrafast Phenomena
The unconventional superconductivity team focus on realizing spin-triplet superconductivity in heterostruc-tures of transition-metal oxides using oxide Pulsed Laser Deposition and Angle-Resolved PhotoEmission Spectro-scopy.
The magnetic topology team leverages chalcogenide Molecular Beam Epitaxy and Spin- and Angle-Resolved PhotoEmission Spectroscopy systems to discover exotic topological phenomena in topological insulators under magnetic proximity effect.
The flat band surface team designs and fabricates artificial Kagome lattices utilizing surface-reconstructed alloys to investigate the properties of flat band systems via Angle-Resolved PhotoEmission Spectroscopy.
The ultrafast phenomena team contributes to the construction of state-of-the-art fiber-laser-based light source to facilitate the studies on electron structure dynamics using Time- and Angle-Resolved PhotoEm-ission Spectroscopy.





Our main experimental technique is Angle-Resolved PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (ARPES), which can directly measure the band structure.